Prehistoric Bugs – Creepy Crawlies We’re Glad Are Gone!

Bugs are everywhere!

Some fly, some crawl, and some even bite!

Bugs have been around since the dawn of time. But the difference between those “early” insects and the ones we have now, is vast.

Let’s take a look at three of the creepiest, crawliest prehistoric bugs we’re glad are gone!

740dc80d15979b0e9316d6e6007ad91dMeganeuropsis Permiana – Giant Dragonfly

This prehistoric dragonfly “buzzed” around Earth around 298 million years ago. Meganeuropsis measured 17 inches long and had a wingspan of 28 inches!

The giant dragonfly liked to dine on other insects. It had powerful jaws and teeth that helped it catch its prey.

Arthropluera – Monster Millipede g800

Millipedes are creepy with all those tiny legs working together. But today’s millipedes don’t have anything on their prehistoric cousins.

Even though Arthropleura isn’t technically a bug (it’s an arthropod) it’s creepiness is second-to-none.

First off, this creature grew to nine feet long! It was covered in tough plates that were divided into three sections (two side plates, and a center plate).

Thankfully it was a herbivore, so all it preyed on was leafy greens.

Jaekelopterus Rhenaniae – Supersized Scorpion

6a00d8341ed39853ef0120a57a28e5970c-800wiHere is another arthropod you wouldn’t want to mess with.

Jaekelopterus rhenaniae grew up to eight feet in length and lived in swamps and rivers. This sinister scorpion was at the top of its underwater food chain, preying on anything that moved.

This creature was so vicious; it’s thought that other sea creatures developed bony armor to protect themselves.

What do you think of these monster insects? You won’t “bug” us if you share, so drop us a line or two.

 

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