Smarty Pants Conservation Kids – K-Cup Craft Seed Starters

 By, Christina Dorudian

Do you ever wonder what you can do with the used k-cup pods in your home? You know, those little containers with coffee grounds in them that your parents use in their coffee maker. Instead of putting them in the trash they can be repurposed. They make excellent seed starters!

Check out this cool Conservation Kids’ craft on how to recycle K-Cup pods as seed starters!

What You Need

images (2)First: Ask your parent to save their used k-cup pods.

Next: Make sure they are cool and then tear off the aluminum lid. You might need some help with this part. The aluminum lid can be recycled.

Then, put the used coffee grounds into a separate container for later use. Many plants in the garden benefit from used coffee grounds as a fertilizer, or they can be added to the compost pile if you have one.

Last, carefully tear out the paper filter. In many areas the filters can be recycled, or they can also be added to the compost pile.

Directions – Planting Steps

Step #1. Rinse out k-cup pods with cool water. Place them on a small tray or plate to download (4)catch any water that will drain from the little holes at the bottom.

Step #2. Fill each k-cup pod about 2/3 full with soil.

Step #3. Place 1 or 2 seeds in each k-cup pod.

Step #4. Cover with soil, water lightly (a spray bottle works great), and place in a sunny area. The kitchen window might be a good spot.

Once the seeds sprout and are higher than the top of the pod they can be replanted into a larger container or in the ground.

Note: Be careful that you don’t pull on the stem, because it can break. Gently tip the pod and push carefully from the bottom. The k-cup pods can be reused again as seed starters.

Not only will you be doing something great for the environment but you will be able to grow your own flowers, herbs, or even vegetables from seeds!

Extras

If you don’t have any k-cups, try using empty yogurt or other small containers as seed starters. Ask an adult to pierce a hole or two at the bottom of these types of containers for the water to drain.

About the Author

Christina Dorudian is a writer, poet, and elementary school teacher living is San Diego, California with her husband and German Shepherd lap dog. She is also the mother of two grown sons.

Her writing has appeared in both the juvenile and adult markets including Highlights High-Five, Sparkle Magazine, Writers’ Journal, San Diego Writers, Ink Anthology, and Unincorporated: an Anthology. She has also written articles for local newspapers on topics such as Kindergarten Readiness, and Dog Park Etiquette.

Check out Christina’s story about friends sharing in, Little Mouse’s Sharing Meal.

Categories: Conservation, Crafts

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